Madras Onion/ Shallot Pickle (GF, V)

Madras Onion/ Shallot Pickle (GF, V)

I love pickles. The Indian kind and preferably home-made. Yes, I know they are not good for us - too much oil, spice, salt and therefore sodium, etc. Most Indians would however agree with me, I’m sure, that there’s nothing quite like pickles with parathas or curd rice (rice and yogurt). In India, the variety of pickles available is unbelievable as we make pickles out of just about every vegetable and some fruits, too. The most common pickles are those made of mangoes and lemons.

Palakkad Iyers make their pickles with sesame seed oil and do not use vinegar. The oil and salt ensure the pickles keep. This is not a traditional pickle (traditionally we do not eat onions) but is one of my favourites.

Madras Onion/ Shallot Pickle (GF, V)I love pickles. The Indian kind and preferably home-made. Yes, I know they are not good for us - too much oil, spice, salt and therefore sodium, etc. Most Indians would however agree with me, I’m sure, that there’s nothing quite like pickles with parathas or curd rice (rice and yogurt). In India, th...

Summary

Rate it!0050
  • Coursecondiments
  • Cuisineindian
  • Yield1 jar 1 jar

Ingredients

Madras onions (shallots)
1/2 kg
Sesame seed oil
1/4 cup
Small marble sized ball of tamarind/ tamarind paste
1 tsp a
Mustard seeds
1 1/2 tsps
Curry leaves
2 sprigs
Kashmiri chilli powder
4 tsps
Asafetida powder
1/4 tsp
Fenugreek powder (roast fenugreek seeds and powder)
1/4 tsp
Jaggery powder
2 tsps
Salt
to taste

Steps

  1. Clean the onions. Take a quarter portion of the onions and crush well in the blender. Soak the tamarind in about half a cup of warm water. Don’t bother to do this if using the paste.
  2. Pour the oil into a wok and add the mustard seeds. When they splutter, add the onions, crushed onion paste, the curry leaves and a little salt (not all the salt, only as much as required to salt the onions). Stir, on medium heat, and allow the onions and paste to cook for about 10 – 15 minutes.
  3. Add the chilli, asafetida, fenugreek, and jaggery powders and required amount of salt. Mix well. Add the tamarind liquid next. If using tamarind paste, also add a little less than half a cup of water. Allow to cook, on medium to high heat, stirring frequently till the water evaporates and oil floats up along the sides of the wok.
  4. The pickle is ready. Cool and bottle. Refrigerate.
  5. Serve as an accompaniment to any of these - thayir chadam (yogurt rice), pulav, dosa, adai, chapathi,parathas and even bread.
  6. If you would like this pickle to be a little sweeter, add an extra tablespoon or so of powdered jaggery. The sweeter version is especially nice with pulavs, fried rice, biriyanis or parathas.

This is my entry for February's JFI: Onion being hosted at Radhi's Kitchen.